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About this course

Welcome to Bootiebike Web Design!

Who this course is for

Imagine being able to create a webpage from scratch, using not much more than a text editor. Creating interesting designs that not only convey information but draw in and delight the viewer. And making changes whenever you feel inspired.

If that sounds like fun, then this course may be for you. It will teach you how to use your ‘brushes’ – what you then paint is up to you.

Who it is not for

If all you want is to create a website then this course is not for you. There are quicker ways. For example, you could use an HTML editor such as Dreamweaver, a content management system such as Wordpress, or a website builder such as Wix.

What you will achieve by completing this course

This course does not promise to make you a professional web designer. This is what you can expect:

By the time you have completed the course you will have created a simple website that you can add to and develop as your skills progress.

What makes this course different

This course is different because it has been created by one who began by knowing more about information presentation and Plain English than web design. It also differs in covering topics often found in too great a depth to be readily accessible, or difficult to learn about completely without reference to multiple sources.

What you need to get started

Here are the things you'll need to get started.

Designing for different browsers

Each standards-compliant browser displays webpages slightly differently to the others. This is not a problem. The important thing is to test in a range of browsers to make sure there are no major differences and everything works as intended.

Many people still use Microsoft Internet Explorer, which has never complied with the web standards. Noncompliance causes difficulty for web designers and serious security issues for the user. Microsoft claims that the latest version of Internet Explorer, known as 'Edge', is much better. Even if it is, the troublesome legacy versions are still out there and will remain so for many years.

Designing around the shortcomings of non-compliant browsers is beyond the scope of this course.

Conventions

Here are a few conventions to remember:

Comments

You will notice 'comments' in the code examples used throughout the course. These are written in the code but not displayed by the browser. Comments look like this:

You will find out more about comments in Lesson 27.

Thank you

The author thanks those behind the many superb online web design resources. Frequent reference has been made to these resources and this work would not have been possible without them. Particular thanks are due to the following:

Thank you to Tipuesearch for their great search plugin. And thank you to Wikimedia for some images and content used in the practical exercises.